Celebrating the 19th Amendment: August 26, 2013

26 Aug

SufferageToday marks the 93rd Anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution.  After a very long and hard struggle for women to get the right to vote — fought by such heroes as Alice Paul and many  others — women were finally granted the right to vote.  Finally, in 1920 all women were being treated as full equals.

Oh but wait.  Sadly, this is far from true. While I am exceedingly grateful for the passing of the 19th Amendment, we still have a long way to go towards treating all women equitably.  Even more sad is that the recent Supreme Court ruling regarding the Voting Rights Act.  With this ruling, we now witness the very intentional disenfranchisement of targeted voters: poor women, women of color, and a large percentage of people of color.

Today is a great day for action.  Today we should be standing in solidarity with all women to celebrate the 19th Amendment but to also initiate respectful conversations around what populations are being kept from the polls and how we shore up the heart of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. While five members of the Supreme Court may not remember history, there are many of us that do and are more than happy to offer a history lesson to prevent us from repeating our mistakes.

I would also like to celebrate the National Women’s History Project today, co-founded by Molly Murphy MacGregor. Today is Women’s Equality Day as proclaimed by the President of the United States.   Click here to find out more about the National Women’s History Project.

Advertisements

13 Responses to “Celebrating the 19th Amendment: August 26, 2013”

  1. dykewriter August 26, 2013 at 8:25 am #

    Reblogged this on dyke writer and commented:
    Intresting

    In Canada, we had to go to the British High Court to be declared Persons under the law

    and after that, Canada changed the legal process to terminate inside of Canada

    but interestingly, people men and women – who were employed by the government of Canada were not allowed to vote on their sort of employer, because the part in power is only the government of the day, not the government per se
    until the late 1960s

    but indigenous people of canada were not allowed to vote until the 1970s

    • Michael Hulshof-Schmidt August 26, 2013 at 8:28 am #

      Nina, thank you for reblogging this. How horrifically sad to learn that the indigenous people of Canada were not allowed to vote until the 1970s!

      • dykewriter August 26, 2013 at 3:55 pm #

        don’t gloss over federal employees until the 1960s

        and until 1964, women were paid less in salary and pension benefits

      • dykewriter August 26, 2013 at 3:55 pm #

        I remember when I was a kid and they got to vote

        I was stunned that there were canadians who couldn’t

        it should have been a lesson when I came out at 23

        and lost my civil rights for being honest

      • Michael Hulshof-Schmidt August 26, 2013 at 5:00 pm #

        Sadly, we still have a long way to go for civil rights for all.

      • dykewriter August 28, 2013 at 8:17 am #

        honestly, it’s not even in my top 5 concerns anymore

        the environment matters more than people

  2. Central Oregon Coast NOW August 26, 2013 at 8:27 am #

    Reblogged this on Central Oregon Coast NOW.

    • Michael Hulshof-Schmidt August 26, 2013 at 8:28 am #

      Nancy, thank you for reblogging this!

      • Central Oregon Coast NOW August 26, 2013 at 9:00 am #

        Thanks for writing it! With the Supreme Court’s desecration of the Voting Rights Act, it is important that we be reminded of how important our vote is. I keep being reminded of Rep. John Lewis’ proclamation Saturday at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington: Happy Women’s Equality Day everyone! “The vote is precious, it is almost sacred. It is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have in a democratic society. And we got to use it!” – Rep. John Lewis

      • Michael Hulshof-Schmidt August 26, 2013 at 9:07 am #

        Nancy, thank you for reblogging it and for your comments here. Yes, I love John Lewis! What do we do to counteract the poison of the five Supreme Court justices?

      • Central Oregon Coast NOW August 26, 2013 at 9:10 am #

        We VOTE! And, we work with those who have been disenfranchised by the outrageous state laws that have been passed since the Supreme Court decision to make sure they meet the draconian requirements to be able to vote.

      • Michael Hulshof-Schmidt August 26, 2013 at 9:13 am #

        NICE! I really do love you, Nancy! Yes, we must vote and stand in solidarity with those that have been marginalized.

      • Central Oregon Coast NOW August 26, 2013 at 9:02 am #

        Thank you for blogging this, Michael. We need to be reminded of the importance of our right to vote. As Rep. John Lewis so eloquently said on Saturday at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington: Happy Women’s Equality Day everyone! “The vote is precious, it is almost sacred. It is the most powerful nonviolent tool we have in a democratic society. And we got to use it!” – Rep. John Lewis

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: