Tag Archives: Bayard Rustin

Social Justice and Presidential Medal of Freedom Honorees

12 Aug

2013PresMedFreedomSocJusThis year marks the 50th Anniversary of the Presidential Medal of Freedom  Awards, established by President John F. Kennedy.   For me, this year is particularly impressive because it is also the 50th anniversary of the Freedom March, which was organized by one of my personal heroes, Bayard Rustin, who has been celebrated several times on this blog.

The Presidential Medal of Freedom is the Nation’s highest civilian honor, presented to individuals who have made especially meritorious contributions to the security or national interests of the United States, to world peace, or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors.  While I am not going to address all 16 recipients, I would like to take some time to recognize a handful that I consider Heroes of the World.

Bayard Rustin: I am sad this is a posthumous award, but he so deserves to be celebrated and acknowledged.  Not enough people know that it was Bayard Rustin, close confidante to Dr. King, who worked with King on techniques for nonviolent resistance.  Rustin was an openly gay black man working tirelessly for civil rights.  I cannot fully articulate my admiration for this man.  Of course at the time he was working with Dr. King, it was illegal just to be homosexual.  Some believe that Rustin’s effectiveness was compromised because he was openly gay.  Unfortunately, Rustin started to worry that his integral part in the civil rights movement would undermine the efficacy of the movement and thus offered to step aside.  King supported Rustin’s move to step aside.  As much as I respect and honor Dr. King, I wish he would have shown more support for Rustin.  Let us not forget that it was Rustin that organized the March on Washington.

Sally Ride: Sadly this is also a posthumous award. The world lost a shining light last year when Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, died from pancreatic cancer. She was only 61. She received a bachelor’s degree in English and physics from Stanford and went on to get a PhD in physics, studying astrophysics and free electron laser physics. She responded to a newspaper ad recruiting for the space program and became one of the first women in the program in 1978.

She became an integral part of the space shuttle program and in 1983 became America’s first woman and, at 32, the youngest American in space. Over her NASA career she logged over 340 hours in space. She was the recipient of numerous awards including the National Space Society’s von Braun award. She retired from NASA in 1987 but remained active in education and science. She taught physics at UC San Diego and was director of the California Space Institute. Ride’s most powerful legacy is Sally Ride Science, the program she launched in 2001. The mission of the organization is to

make a difference in girls’ lives, and in society’s perceptions of their roles in technical fields. Our school programs, classroom materials, and teacher trainings bring science to life to show kids that science is creative, collaborative, fascinating, and fun.

Sally Ride also wrote a number of science education books.  I am exceedingly grateful that I had the opportunity to have met Sally Ride.

Gloria Steinem: I have to say that Gloria Steinem is one of the reasons why I wanted to become a social worker.  Steinem is an icon of social justice for women, the LGBT community,  the disenfranchised and all marginalized and targeted populations. Steinem has dedicated her life to creating a level playing field for women, while at the same time embracing and working on issues for all marginalized peoples. In my humble opinion, Seinem’s voice is one of the most important in the 20th and 21st Centuries. My first reading of Revolution From Within: A Book of Self-Esteem, spoke to me as a gay man and how institutionalized oppression can take its toll and how we must unite to speak our own truth. As most of you know, Steinem co-founded Ms. Magazine and helped a culture learn about the power of words: Miss, Mrs. and Ms. I have heard Ms. Steinem speak three times and each time I left in awe and inspired. I don’t understand any of her detractors, for she speaks with such love and compassion. Listening to Steinem, one realized how fully she understands deep rooted patriarchy, misogyny, and oppression. I dare say, her detractors have never heard her speak, nor have ever read anything she has written. Yes, she supports a woman’s right to govern her own body–a controversy that would not exist if there were legislation trying to control what men could do with their bodies. I applaud Gloria Steinem for her courage and for her contributions to social justice, she encourages and inspires us all to understand more about the intersections of oppression.

Besides these personal heroes, three other honorees are particularly notable for their roles in social justice.
  • Oprah Winfrey has used her power and wealth to work hard for women’s rights and education; she is also a champion of the LGBT community. The fact that one of the most powerful, wealthy and recognizable people in the world is a woman of color is of great value in itself.  She is still creating an amazing legacy!
  • Sen. Daniel Inouye also receives a posthumous medal. He served nearly 50 years in Congress, elected when Hawaii became a state; he was the first Japanese American to serve in either chamber. During his long service he was a tireless champion of human rights, supporting civil rights for all including the LGBT community.
  • Patricia Wald is a well-respected appellate judge and a pioneer. She was one of the first women to graduate from Yale Law School. She was also the first woman appointed to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, where she later served as Chief Judge.  She also served on the International Criminal Tribunal in The Hague and currently works for the Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

It is truly wonderful to see such champions of social justice receive this great honor.

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Happy 100th Birthday, Bayard Rustin, Social Justice Hero

17 Mar

Happy 100th Birthday!

Bayard Rustin, one of the greatest leaders in the Civil Rights Movement was born on March 17, 1912.  He would have been 100 years old today.  I know TSM has honored this hero before, but I can’t resist honoring him again.  As a country, we are forever in his debt.

Not many people know that it was Bayard Rustin, close confidante to Dr. King, that worked with King on techniques for nonviolent resistance.  Yes, that’s right NONVIOLENT–what a world away we are now, with the likes of good old whitey Palin and Angle promoting violence.  Rustin was an openly gay black man working tirelessly for civil rights.  I cannot fully articulate my admiration for this man.  Of course at the time he was working with Dr. King, it was illegal just to be homosexual.  Some believe that Rustin’s effectiveness was compromised because he was openly gay.  Unfortunately, Rustin started to worry that his integral part in the civil rights movement would undermine the efficacy of the movement and thus offered to step aside.  King supported Rustin’s move to step aside.  As much as I respect and honor Dr. King, I wish he would have shown more support for Rustin.  Here is a great video clip that credits Rustin for the March on Washington in 1963.  To learn more about Bayard Rustin, I encourage you to read a great biography called, lost prophet:the life and times of Bayard Rustin.  There is also a movie about his life called: Brother Outsider.

Celebrating LGBTQ History Month: June 7, Bayard Rustin

7 Jun

Today I would like to honor and pay tribute to Bayard Rustin.  For those of you that follow SJFA, you might remember we celebrated Rustin before. Rustin is probably most remembered and celebrated for having organized the Civil Rights March of 1963 in Washington D.C., where Dr. King delivered his I Have A Dream speech.  Today, I would like to honor Rustin for having the courage to be openly gay during a time when I can’t even fathom how difficult it must have been for a black man to also be gay in the United States–what courage, what fortitude.  It was Rustin who helped influence Dr. King’s non-violent movement by using techniques adopted from Gandhi.  I almost wonder if such a man could survive in this violence obsessed culture we currently perpetuate, and then I think of how lucky we are to have people like Rep. John Lewis with us.  Click here to learn more about the hero, Bayard Rustin.

John Lewis: Civil Rights Hero

18 Jan

Civil Rights Hero

I’m very glad there was the opportunity to celebrate Dr. King, Coretta Scott King, and Bayard Rustin.  We also must not forget to celebrate Congressman John Lewis.  Many have described Lewis as: “one of the most courageous persons the Civil Rights Movement ever produced.”  Nancy Pelosi once referred to Lewis as, “the conscience of the U.S. Congress.” Lewis maybe the only wonderful politician left in the state of Georgia.  While there are those that claim to have worked closely with King (JJ), Lewis worked tirelessly with Dr. King for civil rights as he continues to work tirelessly.  Georgia is one of the most homophobic states in the country and yet Lewis has the courage to fight for equality.  Like Coretta Scott King, Lewis continues to fight for marriage equality for the LGBT community.  Despite being called the “N” word by Tea Party members, Lewis’ dedication to civil rights for ALL goes unabated. Bravo, Congressman Lewis. Click here for a history of John Lewis.

Honoring Dr. King

15 Jan

Remembering Dr. King

Happy Birthday, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  I have been thinking of Dr. King more than usual in the wake of the tragedy in Arizona, or when I think of the travesty that is Glenn  Beck–what a sad excuse for a human being.  When I get into these dark spots, I try to think of people like Walt Whitman and Dr. King.  How we so desperately need the leadership of Dr. King right now.  In all my readings and listening to Dr. King, never did I hear him talk about shooting people, or physically hurting people that disagree with you.  As a gay man, he earned my respect for appointing Bayard Rustin, an openly gay man, to organize the March on Washington.  I often wonder what Dr. King would think of the culture of violence that has been promoted currently, given that King was a pacifist.  Happy Birthday, Dr. King.  You are loved and missed.  Click here to see his I have a Dream Speech.  As many times as I have seen and heard it, it always makes me cry.

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